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Avoiding blunders.

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  • Avoiding blunders.

    My last 8 chess games against chess players about as good as me have all went like this-I manage to get a nice advantage,whether it's development or material or both,and then I make a blunder.

    A BIG BLUNDER.It might be missing a checkmate,or losing a queen,but it's a blunder.Most of the time though,I play pretty good,and notice every checkmate or threat they can throw at me and I respond accordingly.

    But then,I miss one.I don't know why it happens,but it happens.I try to slow down,to avoid the blunders,but it always invariably happens.

    Could you give me any ways to avoid these crippling blunders?

  • #2
    Blunders are always lurking there just below the surface. As you get better they will become less frequent and less severe (usually) but you will still occasionally blunder. A good idea would be to look at your games and categorize your blunders. Is it because you missed the threat of a long move along a diagonal or rank? Is it because you over-estimated your position? What were you thinking just before you made the blunder?

    Vlad Drkulec

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    • #3
      Originally posted by seraine View Post
      My last 8 chess games against chess players about as good as me have all went like this-I manage to get a nice advantage,whether it's development or material or both,and then I make a blunder.

      A BIG BLUNDER.It might be missing a checkmate,or losing a queen,but it's a blunder.Most of the time though,I play pretty good,and notice every checkmate or threat they can throw at me and I respond accordingly.

      But then,I miss one.I don't know why it happens,but it happens.I try to slow down,to avoid the blunders,but it always invariably happens.

      Could you give me any ways to avoid these crippling blunders?
      A good habit to always follow is look at the whole board.Scan all the piece placement of your opponent and of course your own piece
      Last edited by ryan_c; 09-17-2010, 01:04 AM.
      " Deep calculation is not what distinguishes the champions. It does not matter how far ahead you see if you don't understand what you are looking at. When I contemplate my move, I first must consider all the elements in the position so that i can develop a strategy and develop intermediate objectives"

      -- Garry Kasparov--

      "Tactics must be guided by strategy"

      --- Garry Kasparov--

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      • #4
        Seraine - It is hard to give specific advise without a specific circumstance, but I can tell you of some of my win/draw opportunities that I through away with a blunder

        It usually occured immediately after I had evaluated a move and could not make it because of (fill in the blank) then my opponent would make a threatening move and I would be so consumed by trying to meet that threat that I would fail to reevaluate the previous move; a move that could now be made but for a mental block - because I had just looked at it the move before.

        Evaluate the position after every move!

        That's what helped my game
        dusty

        "I'm not a great believer in the value of preparation, at least for open tournaments. In most cases I think it is better to rest before games and take the view that if I don't know what I'm going to play there's no way my opponent will be able to figure it out!" - Nigel Davies

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        • #5
          Fatigue might be figuring into blunders. Maybe, too, a certain "performance-anxiety" that accompanies good beginnings? Perhaps also an over-fixation upon certain plans/ideas without true attention to the reality as it develops and transforms upon the board?
          "They work at the pace of amnesia."--M. Bloch

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          • #6
            My main blunders are my brain just not thinking/forgetting to think.Does anyone know if Michael De La Maza's strategy works? I'm thinking about trying it out,with the thought that it sounds like all my blunders are tactical ones,and it's supposed to be good for tactics.

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            • #7
              If you want to play chess and make fewer blunders then I suggest you make sure you get plenty of sleep, have a good meal and be patient.

              Examine each square to make sure it is safe.

              Sure, study tactics. The more tactics you know, the more you can take advantage of and avoid. I wouldn't kill myself off doing tactics.

              Everybody blunders, at all levels. The fewer blunders you make, the better your rating will be. We are human, we will blunder. It is part of chess. Sometimes it will lead to a loss, but other times it will lead to wins.

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              • #8
                Every time it is your turn to move, visualize making your move. Then take his role to probe your own weaknesses, and find his strongest response.

                This won't work too well in speed chess, but in normal time controls, you will minimize blunders.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Most gross blunders can be avoided by the following technique; After you move and before your opponent moves, scan all ranks, files and diagonals. This makes sure you aren’t hanging anything and helps avoid another common cause of blunders…tunnel vision where you are fixating on a particular section of the board. It takes some discipline, but if practiced on every move, will eventually become a habit.

                  It also helps if you sharpen your tactical eye by familiarizing yourself with tactical motifs. I don’t mean doing tactical problems so much as learning the “signposts” that tell you a tactic might be present. The guy on this website gives a pretty good list of things you should look for that will tip you off.

                  Discovering Tactical Shots in Your Games
                  The Hoppers

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                  • #10
                    I'm guessing you must mean BEFORE you touch the piece you are about to move...

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Belaji View Post
                      I'm guessing you must mean BEFORE you touch the piece you are about to move...
                      Indeed. I worded that wrong. I meant after your opponent moves and before you move.
                      The Hoppers

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                      • #12
                        Karpov looks like he's doing that when I see him play in videos. His head is always going up down up down, left right left right.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by moocowmoocow View Post
                          Karpov looks like he's doing that when I see him play in videos. His head is always going up down up down, left right left right.
                          I know. I was watching his head and eye movements in one video and got the thought his eyes had to be so tired after a game they must hurt like …, well, really bad.
                          The Hoppers

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                          • #14
                            I blunder a bit to much, this advice will help me too.
                            ElTerremoto
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