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1.c4 b6? (New player)

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  • 1.c4 b6? (New player)

    I am very new to chess, in the sense I have only played a few games within the last week. I was playing a game this morning and can't find the opening in any books, I assume that means it is either non-traditional or a bad opening... Can anyone point me to it by a name or perhaps some ideas of what I should have played or should strive for?

    1. d4 b6
    2. c4 c5
    3. d5 Nf6
    4. Nc3 h6
    5. ?

    (I was going to play 5. e4.)

  • #2
    To determine which moves have been made, or are playable go to:
    Chess Database
    Enter the moves, then click on games.
    What you get, +, -, or = next to each game.
    Chess Base- Online database program, of Opening moves.
    When is not indicated who played the moves.
    That information is probably available on the DVD.
    If no games show, then the moves have never been made.
    The h6 move is suspect.
    Last edited by Malbase; 11-13-2011, 03:27 PM.

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    • #3
      This thread might be of interest to you... http://www.chessforums.org/beginners...rs-4-free.html
      "They work at the pace of amnesia."--M. Bloch

      Comment


      • #4
        You are making a huge error in how you think about chess.

        THe WORST thing you can do when somebody throws an unexpected move at you that looks bad is to run to an opening book and try to figure out what you're supposed to play. That is not the path to chess improvement.

        Instead, think about YOUR strategic goals, think about opening principles, and play chess. Reciting memorized moves isn't playing chess.

        It's worth pointing out that, despite never having seen this opening before, you handle it pretty well:

        1. d4 b6
        2. c4 c5

        I might play 2.e4 here, under the idea that "he wants to give me the center? okay. When weak players give up the center they get crushed!" But 2.c4 is absolutely not wrong - it's a very reasonable move as part of a strategy of central domination, and perhaps the best move on the board.

        3. d5 Nf6

        Your response is perfectly reasonable. He wants to give you central space, you want to take it.

        4. Nc3 h6

        Another reasonable move on your part, supporting your center and getting ready to play e4.

        5. ?

        You were doing so well! Why don't you trust yourself?

        The worst thing you can do is run to some opening book to tell you how to play. You're in a great position here against an opponent who clearly doesn't understand chess very well. Play the board - increase you central domination and shove his pieces off the table!

        Later you'll have to decide if you want to play f4 (which is more ambitious) before Nf3 or not, get your pieces out, and then push through the center. Study Steinitz, Lasker, and Tarrasch for examples of how to use a big center to punish your opponent.

        If you're that new to chess, you might pick up the book "Logical Chess, Move by Move," by Irving Chernev. It'll help you start to develop a more sophisticated understanding of the game.

        But put your opening book away. It's bad for you.

        Comment


        • #5
          As Ronaldinho says, don't run to a book to see how you should reply to everything. Have an idea about what you are trying to do! Where do you want to put your pieces? Why do you want to put your pieces there.

          If your opponent does something strange, see if he has left a gaping opening, then try to take advantage of it. If the move simply does nothing, then continue putting your pieces where you want them and continue with your plan.

          Understand why you are putting your pieces where you put them. Once you do this, you can make adjustments when your opponent makes good moves. If you end up doing something stupid and your opponent punishes you for it, then figure out what you've done wrong and do something else next time.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Malapropism.affect View Post
            I am very new to chess, in the sense I have only played a few games within the last week. I was playing a game this morning and can't find the opening in any books, I assume that means it is either non-traditional or a bad opening... Can anyone point me to it by a name or perhaps some ideas of what I should have played or should strive for?

            1. d4 b6
            2. c4 c5
            3. d5 Nf6
            4. Nc3 h6
            5. ?

            (I was going to play 5. e4.)
            5.e4 is a good move to play in this position. The opening after move 1 is called the English defense. By move three it has transposed into an oddball Benoni. 4.... h6 is a bad move and should lead to a quick demise for black. I would probably think about playing e4-e5 possibly in combination with f4. Black can't play like that and live long.

            You should be aiming to shove the pawns down black's throat and chase the knight from f6. Black's fourth move is bad because it does nothing for black's development and weakens the kingside and in particular the light squares on the kingside. You may wind up pushing a pawn to e6 depending on how things develop at which point the h5 and g6 (or a4 and b5) squares may be used for devastating checks by queen or bishop.

            Vladimir Drkulec
            Last edited by Crash; 11-16-2011, 02:24 PM.

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            • #7
              One more note - after 1.d4 b6 2.c4 c5, White can play 3.dxc5 bxc5 4.Qd5, with a double attack against the c5 pawn and the Rook. You might not want to spend time running around with your queen so early just to win a pawn, but it is an option to consider.
              Contributing more than my share to rating deflation.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Nimzo View Post
                One more note - after 1.d4 b6 2.c4 c5, White can play 3.dxc5 bxc5 4.Qd5, with a double attack against the c5 pawn and the Rook. You might not want to spend time running around with your queen so early just to win a pawn, but it is an option to consider.
                Black probably doesn't get enough for the pawn but after 4...Nc6 5.Qxc5 e6 the queen does get chased around and black has a straightforward path to developing his pieces. 6.Qe3 seems like the best retreat but the queen gets in the way of normal development and is an easy target for additional harassment. For relative beginners it is probably best not to grab such a pawn until they can calculate all the consequences.

                In this case black gets control of the half open b-file. The white queen stands badly on e3. 6....Nf6 already seems to give white something to think about. Rb8 at some point will put pressure on the half open b file and as white you have to be careful of black moves like Nb4.

                A rule of thumb is in the opening if you get three tempi for the pawn then giving up a pawn is a good investment. If you get two tempi and some discoordination in your opponent's camp then again it may be a good investment to give up a pawn. I think that white has to play very accurately to justify his early pawn grab and black has to make some normal developing moves to create a position which may very well give him more than enough compensation for the pawn. I have played against this type of opening a number of times and have almost always won within about 25 moves. There is no reason to try to punish your opponent immediately when he makes a bad move. Wait a move or two until he makes a worse move. That is a joke that has a ring of truth to it.

                Vladimir Drkulec
                Last edited by Crash; 11-19-2011, 03:01 PM.

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                • #9
                  again, following general opening principles at ALL times saves your bacon: grab as much of the center as you can, get your pieces to decent squares, castle, and connect your rooks on the back rank or occupy open files.
                  Alexander Alekhine is my chess hero.

                  An eerie chess short story: The Empty Chair

                  My newest chess story: Gamble: A Supernatural Chess Tale

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